Earth Science Photographs

Minerals

 

Stunning photographs of common and rare minerals, ores, crystals and gemstones.

Telephone:  (+44) 01287 660076
Email:  candhspellant@yahoo.co.uk

We have many thousands of images of specimens from all over the world, and can provide original photographs from our own extensive collection and from museum collections to which we have access.

 

The pictures cover all the mineral groups, and we can supply slides to illustrate accurately the various identification features of shape (crystal and other habits), hardness, density, lustre and colour, cleavage and fracture, transparency and streak. Minerals are very photogenic materials, and we try to show their beauty as well as their scientific features.

 

The natural occurrence of minerals in veins and rocks can be illustrated, as can the important economic uses of many species.

 

We were the main contributor of mineral pictures to the recent Orbis partwork ‘Treasures of the Earth’.

Quartz types.  Quartz is a very common mineral, and occurs in many different rock types as well as in mineral veins and cavities (geodes) in lavas. It is a natural form of silica (silicon dioxide) and forms hexagonal crystals. Some varieties are prized as semi-precious gems, and cut and shaped in jewellery. Here different varieties are, clockwise from top right: Rose quartz, Cairngorm crystal, banded agate slice, blue quartz geode and mass of amethyst crystals from a large Brazilian geode.

Opal from Australia. The shimmering colours of opal change with temperature. Opal is a form of silica with water molecules in its structure. It has been valued as a semi-precious stone for thousands of years.

Hematite and dolomite from Cumbria, U.K. Many minerals are found in association with one another. Hematite is an oxide of iron and the mineral seen here is a valuable ore used in steel making.  It often occurs in limestone where iron oxide has replaced the calcite in the original rock. Two forms of hematite are shown, reniform kidney ore and black crystalline specularite. The creamy-brown crystals are dolomite. These have small curved crystal faces.

All photographs are copyright C and HS Pellant.

Photographs are shown in low resolution.